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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

How can I be sure that I am looking at or listening to a Western Leopard Toad?
Look at our pages on toad identification.


I know that toads breed in a pond near where I live, should I call you?
Most of the useful information on populations comes when the toads are breeding.  Unfortunately, different ponds breed at slightly different times, so we cannot plan ahead.  Please wait until the toads start to call, then Contact the WLT Hotline 082 516 3602. If there is a toad rescue group near you, they will be informed and you may wish to join them. Alternatively, a new group may be needed!

I have found a live Western Leopard Toad on the road, what should I do with it?
Carefully take the toad out of the road and place it on the other side in the direction it was facing or moving. Do not move the toad anywhere else. Do not move the toad to a wetland or pond. The toads can navigate to and from their breeding ponds and their foraging areas. They know where they are going even if you don't! If you move them, they might get lost, or worse might end up in the wrong population.


I have found a Western Leopard Toad in my garden, what should I do with it?
Much of the habitat for Western Leopard Toads is now gardens, so the toad is already where it should be. If you fear that the toad might fall into your swimming pool, or be attacked by your dog, then carefully move the toad within your garden but away from these risks. If you have a lot of toads in your garden, and a digital camera, you could help by taking ID pictures and uploading them to the website: UPLOAD YOUR TOAD. Do not move the toad anywhere else. Do not move the toad to a wetland or pond. The toads navigate very well between their own breeding ponds and their "homes" in your garden. If you move them, they might get lost, or worse might end up in the wrong population.

Are Western Leopard Toads dangerous to people?
Like all other toads, Western Leopard Toads have toxins which are designed to protect the toads from being eaten by predators. The toxins are harmless to the touch and only effective if ingested. It is also a fallacy that toads can give you warts - so you and your family are safe!

My dog has attacked a Western Leopard Toad, will it harm my dog?
All toads have toxins which will be distasteful to dogs. The first taste that your dog gets should be so bad that it lets the toad go and never touches another again. If your dog is persistent or if it is worrying the toad, then carefully move the toad to an area of your garden away from this risk. If you have a lot of toads in your garden, and a digital camera, you could help by taking an ID picture and putting it on the UPLOAD YOUR TOAD website. See our page on toads, dogs and vets.


I don't want Western Leopard Toads in my garden because they can kill my dog/s, what should I do?
Much of the habitat for Western Leopard Toads is now gardens, so the toad is already where it should be. If you fear that the toad might be attacked by your dog, then carefully move the toad within your garden but away from these risks. Toads are very useful in gardens as they eat many pests such as slugs. If you have a lot of toads then consider making an area of your garden which is off-limits to your dogs so that you can place the toads there. You can then put a barrier (such as plastic sheeting) along the bottom of the fence of this section, with openings to allow toads to freely access safer areas in and out of the cordoned section. If you have a lot of toads in your garden, and a digital camera, you could help by taking an ID picture and putting it on the UPLOAD YOUR TOAD website. Do not move the toad anywhere else: this is their home and they will just move back. Do not move the toad to a wetland or pond: they live in gardens. If you move the toad, they might get lost and end up breeding in the wrong population. See our page on toads, dogs and vets.


My dog has eaten a Western Leopard Toad, will my dog die?
All toads have toxins which will be distasteful to dogs. The first time your dog tastes a toad should cure him of ever trying again.  If your dog is one of the very rare dogs that persists in worrying toads and it eats the toad entirely you should contact your vet immediately. If you have a lot of toads then consider making an area of your garden which is off-limits to your dogs so that you can place the toads there. You can then put a barrier (such as plastic sheeting) along the bottom of the fence of this section, with openings to allow toads to freely access safer areas in and out of the cordoned section. See our page on toads, dogs and vets.


My cat/dog killed a Western Leopard Toad, what should I do with the toad?
Place the toad in a plastic bag with a piece of paper stating the date you found it, the place you found it, your name and address and telephone number. Put the bag in your freezer and Contact the WLT Hotline 082 516 3602. The toad will be very useful in genetic and population studies.  It might even have been photographed by someone else who took a photograph.


I found a dead Western Leopard Toad on the road, what should I do with it?
Place the toad in a plastic bag with a piece of paper stating the date you found it, the place you found it, your name and telephone number.
Put the bag in your freezer and then please contact the WLT Hotline 082 516 3602. The toad will be very useful in genetic and population studies.  It might even have been photographed by someone else who took a photograph.


I found a dead Western Leopard Toad on the road but it is too squashed to pick up, what should I do with it?
We need to make a count of all toads that are killed on the roads. If you cannot pick it up, leave it for a toad patrol who will count it. If there are no toad patrols in your area, you can contact the WLT Hotline 082 516 3602.


Toads keep falling into my swimming pool, what should I do?
Inspect your pool every morning and remove any toads as quickly as possible with a pool net. Rinse the toad with fresh water to remove harmful pool chemicals. Put the toads on the other side of your house away from the pool. This would be a good time to get an ID picture on the UPLOAD YOUR TOAD website. Place a piece of polystyrene or a plank of wood into your pool so that the toads have something to climb onto. This way, the toads won’t be so harmed by them chemicals in your pool. An even better solution is to see how easy it is to install a toad saver in your pool.


A toad died in my swimming pool, what should I do with it?
Place the toad in a plastic bag with a piece of paper stating the date you found it, the place you found it, your name and address and telephone number. Put the bag in your freezer and contact the WLT Hotline 082 516 3602. To prevent more toads and other small animals dying in your pool, place a piece of polystyrene or a plank of wood into the water so that the toads have something to climb onto. Even better install a toad saver in your pool. Please see how easy it is to install a toad saver in your pool.


How do I encourage Western Leopard Toads to use my Garden?
See our Page on Toad Friendly Gardens

   
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Information compiled by John Measey, May 2009.